OGC Press Releases

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28 July 2015. Members of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC®) request comments on the draft charter for a proposed OGC Standards Working Group (SWG). The OGC Temporal Well Known Text (WKT) for Calendars Standards Working Group is being formed to adapt existing standards to provide the capability to represent and encode temporal metadata within data sets and protocols that use customised calendars.

OGC Members proposing the OGC Temporal WKT for Calendars Standards Working Group have identified a number of communities who use time representations based on calendars which are not the Gregorian calendar. In order to provide interoperable representations of this metadata, extensions to the current metadata standardisation provision in ISO 19162 (Well Known Text), and potentially in other associated standards, are required. This work will involve adaptations and extensions to existing OGC standards and to ISO standards developed in conjunction with the OGC.

A uniform standard for representing temporal metadata within data sets and protocols has particular business value for the Climate Science community, who make extensive use of such temporal representations. This standards work will also benefit the wide range of communities who are looking to make use of climate data to interact with their own data sets to facilitate further applications. The planned standardization effort will also support uniform communication about time in a very wide range of applications unrelated to climate.

The draft charter is available for review at portal.opengeospatial.org/files/64317. Comments should be sent via email to charter-requests [at] opengeospatial [dot] org and are due by 27 August, 2015.

The OGC is an international geospatial standards consortium of more than 510 companies, government agencies, research organizations, and universities participating in a consensus process to develop publicly available standards. OGC standards support interoperable solutions that "geo-enable" the Web, wireless and location-based services, and mainstream IT. Visit the OGC website at www.opengeospatial.org/contact

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27 July 2015. The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC®) membership announces OGC’s approval of the OGC Common DataBase specification as an OGC Best Practice.

This OGC Best Practice specifies an open format and encoding for the storage, access and modification of a representation of the natural and built environment for simulation applications. CDB defines the data representation, organization and storage structure of a worldwide synthetic representation of the earth as well as the conventions necessary to support all of the subsystems of a full-mission simulator. The Best Practice makes use of several commercial and simulation data formats endorsed by leaders of the simulation database tools industry. The organization of the synthetic environmental data in a CDB is specifically tailored for real-time applications. It supports applications in which inter-connected simulators share a common view of the simulated environment.

A database that conforms to this Best Practice can be readily used by existing simulation client-devices (legacy Image Generators, Radar simulator, Computer Generated Forces, etc.) through a data publishing process that is performed on-demand in real-time.

The application of CDB to future simulator architectures will significantly reduce runtime-source level and algorithmic correlation errors, while reducing development, update and configuration management timelines.

The OGC Common Database Volume 1 (Main Body) and Volume 2 (Appendices) are available at www.opengeospatial.org/standards/bp.

The OGC® is an international geospatial standards consortium of more than 510 companies, government agencies, research organizations, and universities participating in a consensus process to develop publicly available standards. OGC standards support interoperable solutions that "geo-enable" the Web, wireless and location-based services, and mainstream IT. Visit the OGC website at www.opengeospatial.org.

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info [at] opengeospatial [dot] org

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23 July 2015 - The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC®) GeoPackage Standards Working Group (SWG) seeks public input to guide their development and prioritization of new extensions to the OGC GeoPackage (GPKG) Encoding Standard. GeoPackage is an open, standards-based, platform-independent, portable, self-describing, compact format for transferring geospatial information. Adopted by the OGC membership last year, GeoPackage has rapidly become implemented in a broad range of products and applications.

The GeoPackage SWG has posted a survey at http://tinyurl.com/phvjygk. Interested developers and users can offer suggestions. The survey is intended to help members of the SWG understand the requirements from different communities and domains. Stakeholders are encouraged to respond to the survey and to become involved in development and testing to ensure that this international standard meets their needs.

The GeoPackage standard describes a set of conventions for storing various kinds of geospatial data within a SQLite database. GeoPackages are interoperable across all enterprise and personal computing environments, and are particularly useful on mobile devices like cell phones and tablets in communications environments with limited connectivity and bandwidth. All OGC standards are free and publicly available.

The OGC® is an international geospatial standards consortium of more than 510 companies, government agencies, research organizations, and universities participating in a consensus process to develop publicly available standards. OGC standards support interoperable solutions that "geo-enable" the Web, wireless and location-based services, and mainstream IT. Visit the OGC website at http://www.opengeospatial.org/.

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info [at] opengeospatial [dot] org

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22 July, 2015. The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC®) in collaboration with buildingSMART International (bSI) invites sponsorship in a pilot project to help cities around the world benefit from modern standards for geospatial technologies. The Pilot, based in Europe, will demonstrate and enhance the ability of cities to use diverse, interoperating spatial technologies to deliver improved quality of life, civic initiatives and resilience.

Human, natural, and physical systems interact in space and time, and the digital systems in cities will become increasingly diverse and numerous, with many owners. Cities thus need an open, vendor-neutral standards platform for communicating spatial and temporal data. Many of the longstanding technical boundaries separating indoor, outdoor, underground and atmospheric information have been overcome. The FutureCities Pilot will show how cities can begin to reap the benefits.

 Future Cities

OGC and other standards organizations have made recent progress in fields such as city modelling, indoor navigation, citizen science and the Internet of Things. bSI is extending its BIM Standards to encompass infrastructure and other elements of the built environment. bSI and OGC collaborate in areas such as urban and infrastructure modelling and indoor/outdoor navigation.

The FutureCities Pilot will bring together visionary sponsors to help define activities that meet cities' spatial information requirements. All requirements, lessons learned and results will be shared among participants and made available to the public and cities everywhere. Hosting cities will benefit from OGC/bSI-led workshops for scoping and requirements-collecting, introductions to vendors and developers with commitment to open systems, public demonstration and leave-behind solutions. Sponsoring organisations will benefit from the opportunity to directly work with municipal personnel and understand their cities' requirements first hand. Solutions to current urban challenges may act as forerunners for solutions in rural environments. In addition, results will guide future standards development.

Ordnance Survey, a Strategic Member of the OGC, has long used open standards and contributed to their development. As one of the sponsors of this pilot, Ordnance Survey will bring valuable experience and expertise.

The OGC and bSI are reaching out to city departments, companies, professional organizations, foundations and research groups to work with the Ordnance Survey as co-sponsors in this shared-cost, results-oriented collaborative effort. The OGC Interoperability Program has conducted more than 85 collaborative testbeds, pilot projects, interoperability experiments and plugfests.

Organizations interested in sponsoring or hosting the pilot are invited to contact OGC before September 15 to provide input in the planning phase.  Contact Bart de Lathouwer, the OGC Initiative Director for the pilot by emailing bdelathouwer [at] opengeospatial.org.

OGC® is a geospatial standards consortium of more than 510 companies, government agencies, research organisations, and universities participating in a consensus process to develop open standards that support interoperable solutions that "geo-enable" the Web, wireless and location-based services, and mainstream IT. See http://www.opengeospatial.org/.

bSI is the worldwide authority driving transformation of the built asset economy through creation and adoption of open, international standards. bSI has 17 national Chapters across the globe representing all sectors of the construction industry. See http://www.buildingsmart.org/.

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13 July 2015. The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC®) invites organizations with specific spatial data integration requirements to explore a low cost, highly effective, high return on investment testbed approach to meeting those requirements. OGC testbeds are rapid prototyping activities that solve spatial interoperability issues. 


Since 1999, 11 major testbeds (and many pilot projects, interoperability experiments, plugfests etc.) have been organized by the OGC to benefit major organizations seeking to solve spatial data integration problems that no single vendor or integrator could solve for them.

In the planning phase of each testbed, sponsor teams consisting of from 2 to 12 organizations pool requirements, document requirements in use cases, and weave the use cases together in a realistic “grand challenge” scenario. In the implementation phase, multi-vendor teams of expert system architects and developers “rapid prototype” and then document data encodings, service interfaces and best practices that meet the specified interoperability requirements. In a testbed’s final demo event, the participants show what they have accomplished.

The encodings and interfaces often become candidate OGC standards that are vetted, voted on and then adopted by the OGC membership as open international standards. The work frequently involves coordination with other standards organizations.

In addition to tapping the best and brightest world leading domain and geospatial technology experts and sharing the costs of integration, sponsors contribute to international standards that help them protect and build the value of their (geospatial?) technology investments. Testbed 12 sponsors will help shape standards that expand the geospatial technology market, improve choice, and ensure market availability of interoperable system components and solutions over time. Sponsors’ investments are further leveraged by technology providers who do some of their testbed work as an in-kind contribution. In exchange, providers gain expertise, ideas, contacts, visibility and early marketplace insight and advantage.

Organizations frequently join OGC in response to innovations in areas such as integrated indoor/outdoor location services, small cell and near-field communications, web service based building information models (BIM), augmented reality, new database technologies for large-scale data, Internet of Things, smart grid, LiDAR and drones. These technologies and trends provide new capabilities, but they also create new requirements for converging technologies and for sharing, communicating and integrating spatial data. Ongoing OGC standards work, which takes place largely in OGC testbeds, provides the world’s technology users with their principal means of integrating these technologies and avoiding lock-in to proprietary vendor ecosystems. The OGC’s Testbed 11 web page provides information about the process and results of the recently concluded OGC Testbed 11.

From start to finish, OGC Testbeds take from 9 to 12 months to complete.

The OGC invites organizations to become co-sponsors of the upcoming OGC Testbed 12. Organizations that join early maximize OGC staff’s ability to match those organizations’ requirements with other organizations’ requirements, thus reducing each sponsor’s share of the cost. Participants – IT providers, universities, and research organizations – will provide a mix of compensated and in-kind resources to prototype and demonstrate candidate standards, best practices, compliance tests, reference implementations, and proposed enhancements or revisions to existing standards and practices. Testbed 12 kickoff will be in September. Now is the time to get involved in the planning. To learn more, contact Terry Idol, Executive Director, OGC Interoperability Program – tidol [at] opengeospatial.org.

To learn about the recently completed OGC Testbed 11, see http://www.opengeospatial.org/projects/initiatives/testbed11. To learn about other previous OGC interoperability initiatives, see http://www.opengeospatial.org/projects/initiatives.

The OGC® is an international geospatial standards consortium of more than 500 companies, government agencies, research organizations, and universities participating in a consensus process to develop publicly available standards. OGC standards support interoperable solutions that "geo-enable" the Web, wireless and location-based services and mainstream IT. Visit the OGC website at http://www.opengeospatial.org/.

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info [at] opengeospatial [dot] org

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02 July 2015. Members of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC®) request comments on the OGC® Web Coverage Service 2.0 Interface Standard – JPEG2000/JPIP Coverage Encoding Extension – abbreviated as “JPEG2000/JPIP-Coverage”. This candidate OGC Best Practice extends version 2.0 of the OGC Web Coverage Service (WCS) Interface Standard to add support for requesting and returning coverage data formatted as JPEG 2000 (JP2), both as a static image and as a JPEG 2000 Interactive Protocol (JPIP) stream, encoded using either the classic JP2 format or the OGC GML in JPEG 2000 Encoding Standard.

The OGC WCS Standard provides an interface for requesting and returning various types of geospatial coverage information, such as satellite images, regular and irregular geospatial grids, point clouds, and meshes. JPEG 2000 (an ISO/IEC standard) is an image compression standard and coding system. JPIP, also an ISO/IEC standard, is a compression streamlining protocol that works with JPEG 2000 to produce an image using as little bandwidth as necessary. JPIP enables downloading of only the requested part of a picture, saving bandwidth, computer processing on client and server, and time. JPIP allows for the relatively quick viewing of a large image in low resolution, as well as a higher resolution part of the same image.

JPEG2000/JPIP-Coverages details can be found in the candidate OGC Best Practice  document titled OGC® Web Coverage Service 2.0 Interface Standard – JPEG2000/JPIP Coverage Encoding Extension.

This OGC candidate standard is available for review and comment at http://www.opengeospatial.org/standards/requests/136.

The OGC is a not for profit international geospatial standards consortium of more than 500 companies, government agencies, research organizations, and universities participating in a consensus process to develop publicly available standards. OGC’s open standards support interoperable solutions that "geo-enable" the Web, wireless and location-based services, and mainstream IT. Visit the OGC website at http://www.opengeospatial.org/contact.

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25 June 2015. The OGC membership seeks public comment on the candidate OGC® Web Coverage Service (WCS) - Transaction operation extension, version 2.0.

The OGC Web Coverage Service (WCS) Interface Standard is an open standard widely implemented in geospatial applications around the world. The standard’s main function up until now has been to support retrieval of geospatial "coverages" data such as spatio-temporal sensor, image, simulation, and statistics data. With the new Transaction extension, the standard will support not only retrieval but also transactions such as create, update, and delete. When geographic information systems (GIS), scientific models and other geospatial systems and services implement the standard, users of those systems and services gain versatile access to geospatial information from a wide variety of sources. Such access will be useful generally in geospatial information management and use, and also in “big data” applications that involve geospatial data.

This OGC candidate standard is available for review and comment at http://www.opengeospatial.org/standards/requests/135.

The OGC is an international geospatial standards consortium of more than 500 companies, government agencies, research organizations, and universities participating in a consensus process to develop publicly available standards. OGC standards support interoperable solutions that "geo-enable" the Web, wireless and location-based services and mainstream IT. Visit the OGC website at http://www.opengeospatial.org/contact.

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info [at] opengeospatial [dot] org

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29 June 2015. The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) membership has approved the OGC Web Processing Service (WPS) Version 2 Interface Standard.

The OGC Web Processing Service (WPS) Version 2 Interface Standard provides rules for standardizing how inputs and outputs (requests and responses) for geospatial processing services, such as polygon overlay, can be structured in a standard way. WPS also defines how a client can request the execution of a process, and how the output from the process is handled. By implementing this standard, any geospatial processing service, regardless of the source, can be “wrapped” with a standard interface and integrated into existing workflows. WPS supports both immediate processing for computational tasks that take little time and asynchronous processing for more complex and time consuming tasks. Moreover, the WPS standard defines a general process model that is designed to provide an interoperable description of processing functions. It is intended to support process cataloguing and discovery in a distributed environment.

This standard is a continuation of WPS 1.0. It incorporates a range of change requests that have been submitted since the release of WPS 1.0 and further conforms to the OGC standard for modular specifications (OGC 08-131r3). In contrast to Version 1.0, WPS 2.0 provides a core conceptual model that may be used to specify a WPS in different architectures such as REST or SOAP.

The WPS process model has been encapsulated into separate requirements and conformance classes so it may be used independently from WPS servers in process catalogs and metadata records. The expressive power of process descriptions has been enhanced by permitting structured (or nested) inputs and outputs. The concept of process profiles has been clarified and extended to support process descriptions at different levels of abstraction.

Conversely, the process model itself has been largely decoupled from the WPS protocol, allowing the use of other domain-specific descriptions of processes, e.g. those defined in OGC SensorML, and to execute them on a WPS server.  WPS 2.0 also provides a Basic WPS conformance class that comprises the synchronous and asynchronous execution protocol.

The OGC Web Processing Service 2.0 Interface Standard [OGC 14-065] document package can be downloaded from http://www.opengeospatial.org/standards/wps.

The OGC® is an international consortium of more than 500 companies, government agencies, research organizations, and universities participating in a consensus process to develop publicly available geospatial standards. OGC standards support interoperable solutions that "geo-enable" the Web, wireless and location-based services, and mainstream IT. Visit the OGC website at http://www.opengeospatial.org/.

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info [at] opengeospatial [dot] org

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23 June 2015. Members of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC®) request comments on the draft charter for an OGC Hydrologic Features (HY_Features) Standards Working Group (SWG). The purpose of the proposed SWG is to progress the HY_Features hydrologic feature model to the state of an adopted OGC standard for a common and stable identification and referencing of hydrologic features.

Water information needs to be shared between many organisations. HY_Features in conjunction with the OGC WaterML2. standard provides a baseline for improving the way in which water information is organized, managed and shared.

Hydrologic features are the “unit of study” for water information, and a means is required to convey identity of such real-world water-objects through the data processing chain from observation to water information. The work undertaken in the OGC Hydrology DWG led to a series of water-related standards and best practices to manage at different levels of detail the identification, observation and representation of hydrologic features. Examples are the WaterML2.0 standard, the HY_Features common hydrologic feature model and the ongoing GroundWaterML2 work. Each standard is concerned with different aspects of hydrology and water information. In conjunction these standards support a common understanding of the Hydrology phenomenon, which provides the basis of linking application-specific concepts by referencing common semantics. This allows informations systems and Web services as well as domain-specific ontologies (such as the terms using in existing data products) to be linked using a common reference model.

The Hydrologic Feature standard will be split into 3 parts. This approach allows conceptual issues to be addressed separate from physical implementation.

  • Part 1: A HY_Features conceptual model (OGC 14-111). The normative model is a machine-readable Unified Modeling Language (UML) artefact published by the OGC.
  • Part 2: A GML implementation schema suitable for data transfer of HY_Features object instances, based on ISO 19136 Annex E encoding rules for Application Schema.
  • Part 3: OWL and RDF representation suitable for defining links between features that implement the HY_Features model, to based on ISO 19150 encoding rules (when these become an accepted standard).

The draft charter is available for review at https://portal.opengeospatial.org/files/64089. Comments should be sent via email to charter-requests [at] opengeospatial [dot] org and are due by 23 July, 2015.

The OGC is an international geospatial standards consortium of more than 500 companies, government agencies, research organizations, and universities participating in a consensus process to develop publicly available standards. OGC standards support interoperable solutions that "geo-enable" the Web, wireless and location-based services, and mainstream IT. Visit the OGC website at http://www.opengeospatial.org/contact.

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info [at] opengeospatial [dot] org

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18 June 2015. The OGC® membership seeks public comment on the candidate OGC SensorThings API Standard, Part 1. The OGC SensorThings API is a free and non-proprietary lightweight interface specification that simplifies and accelerates the development of Web-based Internet of Things (IoT) applications.

Application developers can use this open standard to connect to various IoT devices and create innovative applications without needing to individually integrate the heterogeneous protocols of the different IoT devices, gateways and services. System manufacturers can embed the OGC SensorThings API in their IoT hardware and software platforms so that the different platforms’ IoT devices can effortlessly connect with other servers that implement the standard. Because device location communication is useful in almost every IoT application, an open, lightweight, widely used standards-based location encoding is part of the SensorThings API.

This new standard is designed specifically for resource-constrained IoT devices and the Web developer community. The candidate standard follows REST principles and uses an efficient JSON encoding and the flexible OASIS OData URL conventions.

The candidate OGC SensorThings API Standard was designed to be compatible with a rich set of proven and widely-adopted open standards, such as the Web protocols and the OGC Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) standards, including the ISO/OGC Observation and Measurement Encoding Standard. Thus the OGC SensorThings API is extensible and can be applied in both simple and complex use cases.

At a high level the OGC SensorThings API provides a Sensing Profile and a Tasking Profile. The Sensing Profile, which is Part 1, provides a standard way to manage and retrieve observations and metadata from heterogeneous IoT sensor systems, similar to the OGC Sensor Observation Service (SOS) Interface Standard. The Tasking Profile, when completed as SensorThings Part 2, will provide functions similar to the OGC Sensor Planning Service (SPS) Interface Standard.

The SensorThings API RFC can be downloaded from http://www.opengeospatial.org/standards/requests/134. Comments are due by 18 July 2015.

The OGC is an international geospatial standards consortium of more than 500 companies, government agencies, research organizations, and universities participating in a consensus process to develop publicly available standards. OGC standards support interoperable solutions that "geo-enable" the Web, wireless and location-based services, and mainstream IT. Visit the OGC website at http://www.opengeospatial.org/contact.

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