OGC Press Releases

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27 February 2015. Members of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC®) request comments on the draft charter for an OGC Common DataBase Standards Working Group. This Standards Working Group (SWG) is being formed to develop and propose one or more candidate standards for a common terrain database model and encoding useful for both runtime synthetic environment generation and terrain database repositories for modeling and simulation.

This SWG will begin work by examining and considering the existing Common DataBase (CDB) Specification Version 3.2 that is currently maintained as a de-facto industry standard by CAE Inc. The convener and charter members believe that the existing CDB specification is a combination of a data model, an encoding specification, and engineering practices / tutorials tailored for implementers of CDB. An early deliverable of the SWG will be a recommendation of which specific OGC standards products and documents are appropriate for conversion of the existing specification to fit more closely within the architecture of OGC standards and practices.

The proposed OGC Common DataBase SWG charter can be downloaded from https://portal.opengeospatial.org/files/62190.

If you have any suggestions or comments, please send them to charter-requests [at] opengeospatial [dot] org

This is a 30 day review period. The review and comment period will end 29 March 2015.

The convener of the OGC Common DataBase Standards Working Group is David Graham, CAE Inc.


The following charter members of the SWG are committed to the charter and projected meeting schedule. Others may join this list before the SWG is officially chartered.

  David Graham, CAE Inc.

  Mike Lokuta, CAE USA, Inc.

  Steve Liang, University of Calgary  

  Dan Maxwell, KadSci    

The OGC® is an international consortium of more than 500 companies, government agencies, research organizations, and universities participating in a consensus process to develop publicly available geospatial standards. OGC standards support interoperable solutions that "geo-enable" the Web, wireless and location-based services, and mainstream IT. Visit the OGC website at http://www.opengeospatial.org/.




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25 February 2015. The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC®) membership has approved the OGC® Smart Cities Spatial Information Framework white paper. This essential document for Smart City systems planning is available free at https://portal.opengeospatial.org/files/?artifact_id=61188.

 

Urban residents make up 54% of the global population, and that percentage is growing rapidly. Effective integration of human, physical, and digital systems operating in the built environment holds the promise of improving the quality of life for urban residents, improving the governance of cities and making cities prosperous, inclusive, sustainable and resilient. Location is a primary method for organizing urban information and services, and communicating about location requires standards. This paper addresses an open information technology standards framework that is critical to achieving the benefits of spatial communication for Smart Cities.

A Smart City uses location as an organizing principal to benefit residents, visitors, and businesses of all types. (Graphic from Steve Liang, University of Calgary)

 

When organized using the concepts of space and time, information about cities can be the basis for many powerful services, analytics and decision-making. Realizing these benefits depends on effective communication of location information. That communication happens when platform, system and application developers agree on location data encodings and spatial software interfaces. Even simple point location queries and responses require agreement on the naming and ordering of many parameters.

 

This OGC White Paper provides the beginnings of a spatial information framework for urban spatial intelligence based on open standards such as OGC CityGML, IndoorGML, Moving Features, and Augmented Reality Markup Language 2.0 (ARML 2.0). A spatial information framework provides the basis to integrate GIS features, imagery, sensor observations and social media in support of city governance and services.

 

Open standards from OGC, ISO and other standards organizations meet the need for interoperability, efficiency, application innovation and cost effectiveness. They have been developed over the last two decades by industry, government, NGO and academic partners. Many of the most important standards are widely implemented by vendors and solution providers.

 

This paper provides critical guidance on how to plan and implement open spatial standards architectures that guide deployment of interoperable information system components. It discusses open standards for mobile location communication, 3D urban models, building information models, indoor navigation, augmented reality, and sensor webs. It also gives Smart City system architects insight into how changing computing paradigms, particularly the widespread use of XML and the rise of RESTful programming, figure into Smart City planning.

 

The OGC® is an international consortium of more than 500 companies, government agencies, research organizations, and universities participating in a consensus process to develop publicly available geospatial standards. OGC standards support interoperable solutions that "geo-enable" the Web, wireless and location-based services, and mainstream IT. Visit the OGC website at http://www.opengeospatial.org/.


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24 February 2015. The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) membership has approved the OGC® Augmented Reality Markup Language 2.0 Interface Standard (ARML 2.0). ARML 2.0 provides a free and open, non-proprietary encoding that augmented reality (AR) content providers can use to specify the visual appearance and real world “anchors” (including location) of virtual objects in an AR scene. Additionally, ARML 2.0 defines an interface (based on ECMAScript) for communicating how user input selects, queries and dynamically changes the properties of these virtual objects.

Augmented Reality (AR) content encoded in ARML 2.0 displayed in Wikitude, Layar and Junaio browsers respectively. (Image from Wikitude)

Augmented reality provides a computer-generated overlay on images of the real world, typically in real time. The overlay provides information — AR content, that is, text and symbols  — associated to real world objects in those images.

AR usually requires a device such as a smartphone that has a screen and camera providing see-through display of real world scenes. The device must also have location sensors (typically GPS) and sensors that detect and report camera motion and orientation. A (usually remote) AR server will have data about the locations of real world objects (spatial coordinates or visual patterns that can be tracked in the camera of the device) and data from an AR content database.  The server thus matches real objects in the image to AR content objects and displays them for the user. The scene and overlaid computer-generated objects are constantly updated as the camera moves. Users interact with the system by pointing and moving the camera, passively or actively selecting real world objects to see their associated AR content. AR content for a mountain landscape, for example, might give the name of the mountain closest to the center of view.

Various vendors aggregate information from restaurant owners, tourism bureaus, etc. to provide computer-generated AR content – text and symbols associated to a particular place. The content can be used only with that vendor’s AR platform. ARML 2.0, on the other hand, provides an open AR content encoding language and service interface. The benefit for content providers is that they can now produce AR content that can be used on any vendor’s AR platform, if that vendor implements the ARML 2.0 service interface. Most existing proprietary content can be converted in a batch process to ARML 2.0 content, thus opening it up to multiple AR platforms and applications.

Martin Lechner, Chairman of the OGC ARML 2.0 Standards Working Group and CTO at Wikitude GmbH, noted the pre-adoption implementations of the standards: "Our belief in the need for an AR interoperability standard has been validated by all the existing and new implementations already making use of ARML 2.0, even before it was officially approved. I am grateful to our Working Group members and all those who helped make this possible. This is an important milestone for everyone seeking interoperability in the awesome world of Augmented Reality!"

Martin Lechner, Chairman of the OGC ARML 2.0 Standards Working Group and CTO at Wikitude GmbH.

The OGC Augmented Reality Markup Language 2.0 Interface Standard document package can be downloaded from http://www.opengeospatial.org/standards/arml.

The OGC® is an international consortium of more than 500 companies, government agencies, research organizations, and universities participating in a consensus process to develop publicly available geospatial standards. OGC standards support interoperable solutions that "geo-enable" the Web, wireless and location-based services, and mainstream IT. Visit the OGC website at http://www.opengeospatial.org/.





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17 February 2015 – The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC®) membership has approved the OGC Moving Feature Encoding Model and Encoding as an official OGC standard. This standard defines an abstract model for encoding moving feature data compliant with ISO 19141:2008 Schema for moving features, and, based on the abstract model, it also includes an XML encoding in the form of an OGC Geography Markup Language (GML) application schema, and a simple CSV (comma-separated value) encoding format.

The advance of mobile computing and internet-connected sensors (including sensors and GPS transponders in cell phones and notebook computers) brings with it a rapid rise in applications for moving feature data, typically representing vehicles or pedestrians. Many innovative moving feature applications will require the overlay and integration of moving feature data from different sources. Examples can easily be imagined for disaster risk management, traffic information services, security services, navigation for robots, aviation or maritime traffic monitoring, and wildlife tracking and conservation. Most current applications, however, are limited to single-source moving feature data. Lack of a standard encoding makes it difficult to integrate moving feature data from different sources.

More efficient exchange of moving feature data will result in a requirement for massive data handling. The CSV style encoding provides an efficient and easily understood standard for encoding lightweight data records, which will be important for many applications involving large data volumes and real-time response. The GML application schema style encoding for Moving Features provides for the encoding of more complex spatial information. The OGC Moving Feature Encoding Model could also support other types of encodings.

This standard addresses only “rigid” moving features, such as vehicles, as opposed to those that deform, such as flood water, and it does not address moving features whose descriptions contain other moving features that must be updated as the feature moves, such as control surfaces on an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). It also is for archived Moving Feature data only, and not for live feeds from sensors.

The OGC Moving Feature Encoding Standard is available at http://www.opengeospatial.org/standards/movingfeatures.

The OGC is an international consortium of more than 500 companies, government agencies, research organizations, and universities participating in a consensus process to develop publicly available geospatial standards. OGC standards support interoperable solutions that "geo-enable" the Web, wireless and location-based services, and mainstream IT. OGC standards empower technology developers to make geospatial information and services accessible and useful with any application that needs to be geospatially enabled. Visit the OGC website at http://www.opengeospatial.org/contact.

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11 February 2015. The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC®) announces that it has adopted the OGC Unified Geo Data Reference Model For Law Enforcement and Public Safety as an OGC Best Practice.

This OGC Best Practice provides guidance for law enforcement, civil security and public safety organizations developing applications from mobile to enterprise systems that require communication and data sharing between many, often geographically distributed organizations. The Best Practice defines a data model for encoding spatially enabled law enforcement and public safety data. The ability to easily and effectively share law enforcement and public safety data across jurisdictional and national boundaries is a critical international need. While there are numerous widely used and excellent national systems for sharing law enforcement data, there are currently no internationally agreed to standards for sharing spatially enabled law enforcement and public safety data. This OGC Best Practice represents a major step forward and provides an opportunity for many organizations to collaboratively define an international standard.

Since 1994, emergency and disaster planning, early warning, prevention, response and recovery have been the focus of many different geospatial standards efforts in the OGC. Hundreds of companies, government agencies, universities, research organizations other standards organizations have been involved. This OGC Best Practice reflects the wisdom gained through that ongoing work and also the commitment and expertise of OGC members whose recommendations reflect current trends in information technology.

Major Mohammed Saleh Al Mansoori Head of UAE MOI GIS Center for Security in Abu Dhabi Police GHQ said, "The development of The Unified Geo-Data Reference Mode (UGDRM) for LEAPS was the result of continuous work undertaken since 2010.The Technical development and efforts included various staff, experts and organizations. The UGDRM is a reference for organizations working in the Geospatial community and LEAPS."

“With as much as 90% of law enforcement and public safety data having location content, it's essential for fixed and mobile users to be able to easily share this data. As a provider of location-enabled information systems globally and as co-chair of the Law Enforcement and Public Safety Domain Working Group, we see tremendous value in Abu Dhabi Police’s OGC approved best practice data model,” said Roger Mann, Lockheed Martin Information Systems & Global Solution's Managing Director - Middle East.

The OGC Unified Geo Data Reference Model For Law Enforcement and Public Safety is free and available online at http://docs.opengeospatial.org/bp/14-106/14-106.html.

The OGC is an international consortium of more than 500 companies, government agencies, research organizations, and universities participating in a consensus process to develop publicly available geospatial standards. OGC standards support interoperable solutions that "geo-enable" the Web, wireless and location-based services, and mainstream IT. OGC standards empower technology developers to make geospatial information and services accessible and useful with any application that needs to be geospatially enabled. Visit the OGC website at http://www.opengeospatial.org/contact

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