OGC Press Releases

Contact: 

Denise McKenzie
Executive Director, Communications & Outreach
Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC)
OGC: Making location count.
dmckenzie [at] opengeospatial.org

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OGC logo                               Ordnance Survey logo        

27 May 2015. The OGC is pleased to announce that Ordnance Survey (OS) has raised its Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) membership level to become the first Strategic Member outside of the USA.

OS joins the US Department of Homeland Security, US Geological Survey, US National Geospatial Intelligence Agency and NASA as strategic members, reinforcing the company’s vision to be at the forefront of open standards development.

As a strategic member OS will use their skill and expertise to drive a collective and unified approach to promoting interoperability for the geospatial industry. The new membership will also allow OS to represent Europe, at a strategic level, to improve the quality of standards globally and to enable the industry to continue to innovate and grow.

“We are very pleased to have Ordnance Survey as a Strategic Member, OGC’s highest level of membership," said Mark Reichardt, President and CEO of the OGC. "OS’s continuing commitment to OGC – they have been a member since 1998 and a Principal Member since 2014 – reflects their strong commitment to the benefits of open standards. As a Strategic Member of the Consortium and as a leader in the international geospatial community, OS is positioned to play an even greater role in the development and implementation of OGC standards and in the international coordination of geospatial technology initiatives."

An important area of focus for OS will be the development of standards in the fast growing fields of Smart Cities, BIM (Building Information Models) and the Internet of Things. Geospatial data has an important role to play in these developing areas and the need for interoperability and common standards is critical to their long-term success. In addition to these emerging areas, OS will also continue to support development of global standards around the more traditional geospatial themes including web map services and 3D mapping, with a specific focus on day-to-day usability.

Neil Ackroyd, Acting OS CEO, added: “Open Standards are key part of achieving our business goals, but we also understand that they are vital to the industry as a whole.  We expect the new level of strategic membership to deliver significant opportunities to OS and allow us to use our skills and expertise to influence and drive new standards in the ongoing and future geospatial trends. I am particularly keen to see greater interoperability in the smart cities space.”

The new OS OGC Strategic Membership was officially announced at the World Geospatial Forum on 27 May 2015.

OS, Britain’s mapping agency, makes the most up-to-date and accurate maps of Britain. OS data and services help governments, companies and individuals be more effective both in Britain and around the world.

The OGC® is an international geospatial standards consortium of more than 500 companies, government agencies, research organisations, and universities participating in a consensus process to develop publicly available standards. OGC standards support interoperable solutions that "geo-enable" the Web, wireless and location-based services, and mainstream IT. Visit the OGC website at http://www.opengeospatial.org/.

To download this press release, go to:www.os.uk/media. You may also view this on our website. For ongoing news updates, subscribe to our Press Releases RSS feed.

Contact: 

info [at] opengeospatial [dot] org

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18 May 2015 – The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC®) announces a Geospatial/BIM/Indoor Location (“GIS BIM”) Workshop to be held at the UCAR/NCAR Center Green in Boulder, Colorado on Tuesday, 2 June 2015. This event is part of the June 2015 OGC Technical Committee (TC) Meeting.

The Geospatial/BIM/Indoor Workshop will focus on developing a work programme to bridge standards gaps between geospatial, BIM (building information modeling) and Indoor Location technologies. Work by standards bodies such as OGC, ISO/TC 59 (Buildings and civil engineering works) and buildingSMART International will be presented. These presentations will shape subsequent discussion about how the organizations might work together to demonstrate data flows and use cases connecting these domains. The geospatial/BIM/indoor location integration topic will also be discussed in the OGC CityGML Standards Work Group (SWG), 3DIM Domain Working Group (DWG), LandInfra DWG and in a planned Indoor/Infrastructure/City ad hoc session.

This discussion and follow-on activities will be of interest to the AEC and building owner and operator industry, emergency response officials, location marketing professionals, city planners and others.

For an agenda and registration, see https://portal.opengeospatial.org/public_ogc/register/1506gisbim.php. You must register to attend but there is no registration fee.

The OGC is an international geospatial standards consortium of more than 500 companies, government agencies, research organizations, and universities participating in a consensus process to develop publicly available standards. OGC standards support interoperable solutions that "geo-enable" the Web, wireless and location-based services, and mainstream IT. Visit the OGC website at http://www.opengeospatial.org/contact.

Contact: 

info [at] opengeospatial [dot] org

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15 May 2015 – The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC®) announces a Water Data Summit to be held at the UCAR/NCAR Center Green in Boulder, Colorado on June 3, 2015. This event is part of the June 2015 OGC Technical Committee Meeting.

The goal of the Water Data Summit is to stimulate engagement in development of tools and policies for the U.S. Open Water Data Initiative (OWDI). The Open Water Data Initiative will integrate different sources of water information into a connected, national water data framework and leverage existing systems, infrastructure and tools to underpin innovation, modeling, data sharing, and solution development.

Similar initiatives are being pursued in Europe, Australia, New Zealand and other regions. The main objective of this particular event is to acquaint the OGC community and the broader geoscience community with recent advancements in high-resolution forecasting of precipitation, runoff, streamflow, and flooding across the continental U.S. in near-real time. These advancements represent the first time that surface water flows have been modeled and studied at the national scale. Similar data and tools from the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF) in UK and the Joint Research Centre (JRC) in Italy are being applied on a global scale through the GEOSS Architecture Implementation Pilot.  The integrative framework, data and models being developed are enabling a major shift in the kinds of questions and issues scientists, meteorologists, and emergency response teams can start to address.

This research and development will be of interest to geoscientists in atmospheric and hydrological domains, as well as to operational meteorologists and even local-level public safety officials such as fire and police departments responsible for emergency response. The latter are among the key beneficiaries of this work.

For an agenda, details and registration, see the Water Data Summit web page. You must register to attend but there is no registration fee.

The OGC is an international geospatial standards consortium of more than 500 companies, government agencies, research organizations, and universities participating in a consensus process to develop publicly available standards. OGC standards support interoperable solutions that "geo-enable" the Web, wireless and location-based services, and mainstream IT. Visit the OGC website at http://www.opengeospatial.org/contact.

Contact: 

info [at] opengeospatial [dot] org

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14 May 2015 – The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC®) invites attendance at the June 2015 OGC Technical Committee Meeting be held at UCAR/NCAR Center Green in Boulder, Colorado 1 June to 5 June, 2015. In addition to a rich agenda of Working Group meetings and special events, there will be a dinner reception and Gardels Award announcement on Wednesday evening at the NCAR/UCAR Mesa Laboratory. 

The week’s special events include the final OGC Testbed 11 Demonstration plus: a Point Cloud Ad Hoc meeting, a Geospatial/BIM/Indoor Location Workshop (“GIS BIM” in the TC agenda), a Water Data Summit, and a GeoSemantics Summit. 
  • Monday, 1 June – Point Cloud ad hoc meeting: In recent months there has been a growing interest from the OGC membership and the global geospatial community in the  interoperability of point cloud data, including LIDAR. In response, the OGC has scheduled a Point Cloud ad hoc meeting on this topic.  The meeting will take place on 1 June from 1300-1445 Mountain / 1900-2045 UTC, and is open to the public. Remote access to the ad hoc meeting will be provided. An initial agenda for this meeting and remote access details are posted at:  https://portal.opengeospatial.org/files/63241.
  • Tuesday, 2 June – Geospatial/BIM/Indoor Workshop: This workshop will focus on developing a work programme to bridge gaps between geospatial, BIM (building information model) and Indoor Location technologies. Work from standards bodies such as OGC, ISO/TC 59 (Buildings and civil engineering works) and buildingSMART International will be presented. Following these presentations, there will be discussion about how the organizations might  work together to demonstrate data flows and use cases connecting these domains. This topic will also be discussed in the OGC CityGML Standards Work Group (SWG), 3DIM Domain Working Group (DWG), LandInfra DWG and in a planned Indoor/Infrastructure/City ad hoc DWG.
  • Wednesday, 3 June – OGC Water Data Summit: This summit is intended to stimulate engagement in development of tools and policies for the U.S. Open Water Data Initiative (OWDI). The Open Water Data Initiative will integrate currently fragmented water information into a connected, national water data framework and leverage existing systems, infrastructure and tools to underpin innovation, modeling, data sharing, and solution development.
  • Wednesday, 3 June – GeoSemantics Summit: The GeoSemantics: Standards Intersect Ontologiessummit, hosted by the OGC GeoSemantics Domain Working Group, is focused on bringing the informal linked data and formal ontology worlds closer together in the geospatial standards development process. Participants will share knowledge, present examples, and address issues involving geospatial ontologies.
  • Thursday, 4 June 2015 – Testbed 11 Demonstration: The OGC will demonstrate the results of theeleventh OGC Interoperability Testbed. Testbed 11 supports national climate-change preparedness by focusing on ways in which open standards support cross-community interoperability, urban-climate resilience (preparation for impacts of climate change), and secure exchange of spatial information in the context of the US National Information Exchange Model NIEM.
OGC Domain Working Groups and Standards Working Groups will meet to discuss exciting work in areas such as Agriculture (see the recently announced Soil Data Interoperability Experiment), GeoSemantics, sensor integration (see recently announced IMIS IoT Pilot Project), and hydrological informatics (see OGC WaterML2.0 part 2 - Ratings Gaugings & Sections Standard).
 
Those seeking to attend special events (except the GeoSemantics summit) must register for the OGC Technical Committee Meeting and pay the registration fee. Then they must also register for each of the special events they want to attend, so that we know how many attendees to accommodate. There is, however, no additional fee for any of the special events. The GeoSemantics: Standards Intersect Ontologies Summit requires special event registration, but a Technical Committee Meeting registration is not required and there is no fee for attending this Summit. (Registration for this or any of the other special events does not authorize attendance at other Technical Committee sessions.)
 
For agenda, details and registration, see the June 2015 OGC TC/PC meetings page.
 
The OGC is an international geospatial standards consortium of more than 500 companies, government agencies, research organizations, and universities participating in a consensus process to develop publicly available standards. OGC standards support interoperable solutions that "geo-enable" the Web, wireless and location-based services, and mainstream IT. Visit the OGC website at http://www.opengeospatial.org/contact.
Contact: 

info [at] opengeospatial [dot] org

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12 May 2015 - The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC®) has issued a corrigendum to correct minor flaws in the OGC GeoPackage (GPKG) Encoding Standard. The flaws were identified after publication of Version 1.0 in early 2014. A key reference for Well Known Binary was changed from ISO 13249-3 (which requires a fee to access) to OGC 06-103r4 (which is available free of charge). All changes from 1.0.0 are marked in the document and detailed in the Revision History (Annex B.6).

GeoPackage is an open, standards-based, platform-independent, portable, self-describing, compact format for transferring geospatial information. The GeoPackage standard describes a set of conventions for storing the following within an SQLite database:

  • vector features
  • tile matrix sets of imagery and raster maps at various scales
  • schema
  • metadata
  • extensions

GeoPackages are interoperable across all enterprise and personal computing environments, and are particularly useful on mobile devices like cell phones and tablets in communications environments with limited connectivity and bandwidth.

GeoPackage was developed by OGC members with additional participation by interested developers using GitHub as a collaborative framework. The OGC GeoPackage Encoding Standard with corrigendum can be viewed at http://www.geopackage.org/. All OGC standards are free and publicly available.

At the upcoming OGC Testbed 11 Demonstration on 4 June 2015 at the OGC Technical Committee Meeting in Boulder, Colorado GeoPackage being used for cross-community sharing of geospatial data and services will be demonstrated. Among other innovations, Testbed 11 has advanced the state of the art in creating GeoPackages and using GeoPackages for transactional applications and geosynchronization in secure environments.

The OGC® is an international geospatial standards consortium of more than 500 companies, government agencies, research organizations, and universities participating in a consensus process to develop publicly available standards. OGC standards support interoperable solutions that "geo-enable" the Web, wireless and location-based services, and mainstream IT. Visit the OGC website at http://www.opengeospatial.org.

Contact: 

info [at] opengeospatial [dot] org

Content: 

6 May, 2015. On 4 June, 2015 the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC®) will demonstrate the results of the eleventh OGC Interoperability Testbed. The demonstration will be held during the OGC Technical Committee Meeting in Boulder, Colorado, USA.

In December 2014 the White House Office of Science and Technology (OSTP) released a Policy Fact Sheet titled "Harnessing Climate Data to Boost Ecosystem & Water Resilience." The Fact Sheet notes OGC’s commitment to increase open access to climate change information using open standards. Testbed 11, sponsored by an international group of government agencies, is mentioned in the OSTP document.

Testbed 11 supports national climate-change preparedness by focusing on ways in which open standards support cross-community interoperability, urban-climate resilience (preparation for impacts of climate change), and secure exchange of spatial information in the context of the US National Information Exchange Model NIEM.

Nine Testbed 11 sponsors documented interoperability requirements and objectives for this activity. Thirty organizations selected to participate in Testbed 11 then developed solutions based on the sponsors’ use cases, requirements and scenarios described in a Call for Proposals. Participants’ solutions implement existing OGC standards as well as prototypes of possible interface and encoding candidate standards. Some of the prototypes may ultimately become OGC standards, revisions to existing OGC standards, or best practices for using OGC standards.

Testbed 11 Sponsors include:

  • European Organization for the Safety of Air Navigation (EUROCONTROL)
  • Land Information New Zealand (LINZ)
  • National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)
  • National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA)
  • UAE Ministry of Interior Abu Dhabi Police GIS Center for Security (UAE ADP-GIS SC)
  • UK Defense Science and Technology Lab (UK-DSTL)
  • US Department of Homeland Security (DHS)
  • US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)
  • US Geological Survey (USGS)

Testbed participants tied numerous sponsor requirements together within the Flood / Climate Change scenarios to demonstrate interoperable solutions to meet these goals:

  • Advance OGC Architecture with respect to REST and SOAP design patterns for synchronization of geodata across data stores, as well as storage and synchronization of geodata in GeoPackages;
  • Evaluate approaches to JSON and GeoJSON encodings as well as vector data and image streaming in the OGC standards framework;
  • Integrate high-resolution simulation models into geospatial infrastructures using the OGC Web Processing Service;
  • Advance use of Linked Data and semantic enabling of OGC Web Services, with a special focus on Hydrographic Data;
  • Advance use of OGC Catalog Services;
  • Advance use of spatially-enabled Social Media data;
  • Advance use of a common symbology that can be used to share common operational pictures in an international environment;
  • Advance compliance tests for the OGC Web Feature Service and Catalog 3.0 Service interface standards;
  • In Aviation, advance a Digital Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) validation service and enrichment service and advance use of Aviation Feature Schema (AFX). Also develop guidance on using geometrical constraints in the Semantics of Business Vocabulary and Rules (SBVR) (an Object Management Group standard).

Those testbed goals sort into these technology threads:

  • Urban-Climate Resilience (UCR) Thread
  • Cross-Community Interoperability (CCI) Thread
  • Aviation Thread
  • Geospatial Enhancements for NIEM (Geo4NIEM) Thread

The demo results have enormous potential for the testbed stakeholders – both technology users and the technology providers – and for the world at large. The return on the shared investment in spatial standards is extraordinary, much like the return on the original shared investments in http and html.

Some of the Testbed 11 sponsors have already begun assembling interoperability requirements for Testbed 12, which will begin in the fall. The sponsors and the OGC invite other organizations to bring their requirements into the discussion.

If you want to learn more about the upcoming Testbed 11 demo and/or the upcoming Testbed 12 opportunity, please contact Lew Leinenweber, Director Interoperability Programs (lleinenweber [at] opengeospatial.org). See http://www.opengeospatial.org/ogc/programs/ip for more information about the 15 year old OGC Interoperability Program in which OGC testbeds, pilot projects and interoperability experiments are organized, planned and managed.

The OGC® is an international geospatial standards consortium of more than 500 companies, government agencies, research organizations, and universities participating in a consensus process to develop publicly available standards. OGC standards support interoperable solutions that "geo-enable" the Web, wireless and location-based services, and mainstream IT. Visit the OGC website at http://www.opengeospatial.org/.

Contact: 

info [at] opengeospatial [dot] org

Content: 

7 May 2015 – The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) has announced a Call for Participation (CFP) in the OGC Soil Interoperability Experiment (Soil IE).

2015 is the International Year of Soils. The need for an improved understanding of soil distribution, function and state has never been more important to support science and policy development, to improve agricultural productivity in a sustainable manner and to address other global issues such as climate change and biodiversity decline. This understanding needs to be underpinned by quality-assessed soil data and information that can be organised, aggregated and made accessible in a consistent granular and consumable form.

Modern digital soil mapping and modelling techniques are of great value for decision support but these models often depend on dispersed, inconsistent and difficult-to-access digital data. Clearly modern, harmonized and interoperable information systems are required to integrate these data into a consistent set of soil information. Various initiatives have started work on the soil data integration problem by defining soil information models. A few examples include: the European INSPIRE, e-SOTER and ISO 28258 (SoilML); the international GlobalSoilMap.net consortium, and the Australian and New Zealand ANZSoilML projects. The UN FAO Global Soil Partnership recognise the value of all of these projects, particularly for Pillars 4 (Global Soil Information System) and 5 (Harmonization). Nevertheless, we still have a situation where we must reconcile multiple systems that often have the same objectives.

Harmonizing inconsistent data is a time-consuming process – some estimates state that 80% of a scientist’s time can be occupied getting data into a state where it can be analysed.  This process must be repeated with each project. The OGC Soil Data IE aims to reverse that by allowing data integration to be automated as much as possible.

To this end the International Union of Soil Sciences (IUSS) Working Group on Soil Information Standards (WGSIS) is working to consolidate these information models and reconcile them into a single language for the exchange of globally consistent soil information. WGSIS is not expecting participants to change their information systems; instead the goal is to develop a common soils data model which each system uses to communicate with all other soil information systems.

The WGSIS proposes validating the soils data model by running an Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) interoperability experiment. The OGC has a strong environmental focus. Active OGC working groups address data issues for agriculture, geology, hydrology, groundwater, climate and Earth observations. An OGC Interoperability Experiment is a rapid, low overhead, formally structured OGC-facilitated activity in which members achieve specific technical objectives that further the OGC Standards Baseline. The soil interoperability experiment will refine and test SoilML2, consolidating existing soil standards by testing them (through working implementations) against an agreed set of use cases for the exchange and analysis of soil data. To do this WGSIS needs global support and acceptance, building a globally representative community that provides both domain and technical expertise to this project. While the OGC is a member-driven organisation, and WGSIS needs a core of OGC members to support and initiate this work, non-members can participate in an ‘observer’ status.

The initiators ask for interested organizations to indicate their support and commitment to be involved in this interoperability experiment. Potential participants are invited to attend the upcoming OGC Technical Committee meeting in Boulder Colorado to learn more. Participants in the OGC Soil Data IE, which will run until December 2015, will test implementations and provide constructive comments on the exchange data model and resulting trial documentation. Experience has shown that those working in these initiatives gain valuable insights that can be used to improve existing information systems or fast-track the development of new systems. Those that participate will gain sufficient expertise to start deploying working services for their existing data and local situations.

The OGC members that are acting as initiators of the Soil Data Interoperability Experiment are:

  • CSIRO (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation), Australia
  • Landcare Research New Zealand Ltd.
  • ISRIC - World Soil Information, Netherlands

All three organizations are members of WGSIS.

A summary of the activity plan, requirements for participation, schedule, and kick-off meeting details are available at: https://portal.opengeospatial.org/files/?artifact_id=63190&version=1 . The Initiative Manager is David Medyckyj-Scott. Contact details are included in the activity plan.

The OGC® is an international geospatial standards consortium of more than 500 companies, government agencies, research organizations, and universities participating in a consensus process to develop publicly available standards. OGC standards support interoperable solutions that "geo-enable" the Web, wireless and location-based services, and mainstream IT. Visit the OGC website at http://www.opengeospatial.org/contact.

Contact: 

info [at] opengeospatial [dot] org

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5 May 2015 – The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC®) membership has adopted the OGC Well-known Text (WKT) Representation of Coordinate Reference Systems Encoding Standard.

Well-Known Text (WKT), specified several years ago in the OGC and International Organization for Standardization (ISO) standard, “Geographic information – Simple feature access – Part 1: Common architecture”, describes a compact machine- and human-readable representation of geometric objects. The newly announced standard revises the earlier WKT specification to be consistent with OGC Abstract Specification Topic 2 and ISO 19111:2007 - Spatial referencing by coordinates. It also extends the content to include coordinate transformation definitions.

The text strings specified in the new standard provide a means for humans and machines to correctly and unambiguously interpret and utilise a coordinate reference system definition. Look-ups or external references are necessary only to define coordinate operation mathematics.

The Well-known Text Representation of Coordinate Reference Systems Encoding Standard was prepared by the Open Geospatial Consortium jointly with ISO Technical Committee ISO/TC 211, Geographic information/Geomatics. The document will also be published as ISO 19162.

The OGC Well-known Text (WKT) Representation of Coordinate Reference Systems Encoding Standard is available at http://docs.opengeospatial.org/is/12-063r5/12-063r5.html.

The OGC® is an international consortium of more than 500 companies, government agencies, research organizations, and universities participating in a consensus process to develop publicly available geospatial standards. OGC standards support interoperable solutions that "geo-enable" the Web, wireless and location-based services, and mainstream IT. Visit the OGC website at http://www.opengeospatial.org/

Contact: 

info [at] opengeospatial [dot] org

Content: 

30 April 2015 – On 3 June 2015, the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) GeoSemantics Domain Working Group will host a summit, "GeoSemantics: Standards Intersect Ontologies". This summit will be part of the OGC’s June 2015 Technical Committee meeting in Boulder, Colorado. The Summit’s central topic is the application of ontologies in standards-based geo-information infrastructures.

The idea of the Semantic Web has been around for well over 10 years, and more recently principles of Linked Data have been gaining a lot of momentum. The Semantic Web involves data elements and connections between them being published on the Web in order to provide concrete opportunities for experimentation in semantic applications. Well defined, community agreements on semantics hold considerable promise for solving harmonization and integration of geospatial data sources from different regions, domains, and communities. Due to the universality of location and time geospatial (and temporal) semantics particularly have potential for advancing integration of both geospatial and non-geospatial data. At the same time, ontologies are increasingly a part of formal information specifications and models. This OGC summit is focused on bringing the informal linked data and formal ontology worlds closer together in the geospatial standards development process. This Call is for participants to share knowledge, present examples, and address issues involving geospatial ontologies. Topics of particular relevance include:

  1. Existing generic ontologies or vocabularies for the geospatial domain. GeoSPARQL is the only current standard, but it is focused on geometry; are there improvements to be suggested? Which other candidates are there? For example, there is the U.S. government's National System for Geospatial Intelligence (NSG) Enterprise Ontology (NEO) and NSG Feature Data Dictionary (NFDD). The W3C/OGC Spatial Data on the Web Working Group will address this topic in its "Best Practice" deliverable. However, the geospatial domain has specialized needs not likely to be addressed by the W3C. Should OGC address these needs with a central geospatial ontology standard, an assortment of geospatial ontology patterns, or general rules for formation of geospatial ontologies from other semantic / syntactic representations?
  2. Should OGC register existing or proposed domain specific ontologies/vocabularies such as Semantic Sensor Networks (SSN), USGS National Map (TNM) ontologies, OWS-10 geospatial ontologies, etc.
  3. There are many standardized spatial information models available as UML from ISO and OGC, as well as from INSPIRE and various national bodies. Work is ongoing in deriving OWL ontologies from these models; one approach is being developed in ISO 19150-2. What is the state of the art and any current issues with this sort of rule-based mapping?
  4. Linked Data and graph data models. Besides facilitating formal semantics, do graph models add value to spatial data representation in and of themselves? Are there problems yet to solve with graph models in relation to spatial data?
  5. Another application of semantics involves the use of ontologies in conjunction with OGC web services. What are the practices and issues here?
  6. Geosemantics issues have been worked on in the present OGC Testbed 11 as well as in several previous OWS testbeds. What are their lessons for the adoption of ontology and formal semantics?

To be considered for participation in the summit, please send a short abstract of your proposed contribution (200 – 400 words) to Linda van den Brink (l.vandenbrink [at] geonovum.nl) so that we can develop a final agenda appropriate to the interests and backgrounds of the participants.

Event Registration

To register for the event please visit the registration page.

About the OGC

The OGC® is a not-for-profit international consortium of more than 500 companies, government agencies, research organizations, and universities participating in a consensus process to develop open and publicly available geospatial standards. OGC standards support interoperable solutions that "geo-enable" the Web, wireless and location-based services, and mainstream IT. Visit the OGC website at http://www.opengeospatial.org/.

Contact: 

info [at] opengeospatial [dot] org

Content: 

22 April 2015. The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC®) has issued a Request for Quotations/Call for Participation (RFQ/CFP) in the OGC Incident Management Information Sharing Internet of Things Pilot Project (IMIS IoT Pilot). Participants in the IMIS IoT Pilot will prototype and demonstrate standards-based approaches to a series of challenges that hinder effective use of large numbers of diverse sensors for use in emergency response and disaster response situations.

OGC pilot projects apply and test OGC standards in real world applications using Standards Based Commercial Off-The-Shelf (SCOTS) products that implement OGC standards and other related standards.

IMIS IoT Pilot sponsors have documented interoperability requirements and objectives for this pilot activity. Organizations selected to participate in the IMIS IoT Pilot will develop solutions based on the sponsors’ use cases, requirements and scenarios, which are described in detail in the RFQ/CFP. Participants’ solutions will implement existing OGC standards as well as new prototype interface and encoding specifications introduced or developed in OGC testbeds. Outcomes will be documented in public OGC Engineering Reports. These may result in OGC discussion papers, best practices or new standards-prototyping activities.

IMIS IoT Pilot design

Figure: Initial notional system design for the IMIS IoT Pilot. (SWE: OGC Sensor Web Enablement Standards. S-Hub: Sensor Hub. HubCat: Catalog of registered sensors and sensor types. WMS: OGC Web Map Service Interface Standard. SOS/STA: OGC Sensor Observation Service Interface Standard/OGC Lightweight SOS Profile for Stationary In-Situ Sensor Best Practice. WNS: OGC Web Notification Service Discussion Paper.)

IMIS sponsors include:

The RFQ/CFP and information about the IMIS pilot project are available at http://www.opengeospatial.org/standards/requests/133. Responses are due by 5:00 pm EDT on 22 May 2015.

If you want to learn more about this opportunity, please contact Lew Leinenweber, Director Interoperability Programs (imis-iot-responses [at] opengeopatial [dot] org). See http://www.opengeospatial.org/ogc/programs/ip for more information about the 15-year-old OGC Interoperability Program in which OGC testbeds, pilot projects and interoperability experiments are organized, planned and managed.

The OGC® is an international geospatial standards consortium of more than 500 companies, government agencies, research organizations, and universities participating in a consensus process to develop publicly available standards. OGC standards support interoperable solutions that "geo-enable" the Web, wireless and location-based services, and mainstream IT. Visit the OGC website at http://www.opengeospatial.org/.

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