OGC Press Releases

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22 April 2015. The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC®) has issued a Request for Quotations/Call for Participation (RFQ/CFP) in the OGC Incident Management Information Sharing Internet of Things Pilot Project (IMIS IoT Pilot). Participants in the IMIS IoT Pilot will prototype and demonstrate standards-based approaches to a series of challenges that hinder effective use of large numbers of diverse sensors for use in emergency response and disaster response situations.

OGC pilot projects apply and test OGC standards in real world applications using Standards Based Commercial Off-The-Shelf (SCOTS) products that implement OGC standards and other related standards.

IMIS IoT Pilot sponsors have documented interoperability requirements and objectives for this pilot activity. Organizations selected to participate in the IMIS IoT Pilot will develop solutions based on the sponsors’ use cases, requirements and scenarios, which are described in detail in the RFQ/CFP. Participants’ solutions will implement existing OGC standards as well as new prototype interface and encoding specifications introduced or developed in OGC testbeds. Outcomes will be documented in public OGC Engineering Reports. These may result in OGC discussion papers, best practices or new standards-prototyping activities.

IMIS IoT Pilot design

Figure: Initial notional system design for the IMIS IoT Pilot. (SWE: OGC Sensor Web Enablement Standards. S-Hub: Sensor Hub. HubCat: Catalog of registered sensors and sensor types. WMS: OGC Web Map Service Interface Standard. SOS/STA: OGC Sensor Observation Service Interface Standard/OGC Lightweight SOS Profile for Stationary In-Situ Sensor Best Practice. WNS: OGC Web Notification Service Discussion Paper.)

IMIS sponsors include:

The RFQ/CFP and information about the IMIS pilot project are available at http://www.opengeospatial.org/standards/requests/133. Responses are due by 5:00 pm EDT on 22 May 2015.

If you want to learn more about this opportunity, please contact Lew Leinenweber, Director Interoperability Programs (imis-iot-responses [at] opengeopatial [dot] org). See http://www.opengeospatial.org/ogc/programs/ip for more information about the 15-year-old OGC Interoperability Program in which OGC testbeds, pilot projects and interoperability experiments are organized, planned and managed.

The OGC® is an international geospatial standards consortium of more than 500 companies, government agencies, research organizations, and universities participating in a consensus process to develop publicly available standards. OGC standards support interoperable solutions that "geo-enable" the Web, wireless and location-based services, and mainstream IT. Visit the OGC website at http://www.opengeospatial.org/.

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20 April 2015. The OGC membership has approved “OGC Compliance Overview - Guide for Software Acquisition” as an official OGC white paper. The document is located here: http://docs.opengeospatial.org/wp/15-002r5/15-002r5.html.

This white paper provides an overview of the OGC compliance process. It describes the benefits of acquiring OGC compliant products, as opposed to products that implement OGC standards but have not been certified as being OGC compliant.

The white paper also provides guidance regarding language to use in specifying requirements for OGC compliant products in software acquisition (procurement) documents.  Government procurements that specifically require OGC compliant products maximize the likelihood of system-to-system interoperability and efficient sharing of geospatial data.

For further information please contact:

Luis Bermudez
Executive Director Compliance & E-learning
Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC)
Phone: +1 301 760 7323
Email: lbermudez [at] opengeospatial [dot] org

The OGC® is a not-for-profit international consortium of more than 500 companies, government agencies, research organizations, and universities participating in a consensus process to develop open and publicly available geospatial standards. OGC standards support interoperable solutions that "geo-enable" the Web, wireless and location-based services, and mainstream IT. Visit the OGC website at http://www.opengeospatial.org/

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9 April 2015 - The membership of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC®) seeks public comment on the candidate WaterML2.0 - part 2: Ratings, Gaugings and Sections Standard.

WaterML2.0 represents an initiative within the joint World Meteorological Organization (WMO) / OGC Hydrology Domain Working Group to address standards development and interoperability of hydrological information systems at an international level. The first part of WaterML2.0 focused on a standard information model, and an XML encoding derived from that model, for time series of hydrological observations.

The candidate WaterML2.0 - part 2: Ratings, Gaugings and Sections Standard describes an information model for exchanging rating tables, gauging observations and river sections.

Rating tables, often represented as rating curves, are mathematical relationships allowing conversion from a physical phenomena to an estimate of a related phenomena; the captured relationship represents an approximation of a physical relationship. The most commonly employed rating tables in hydrology are stage-discharge rating curves, which allow for estimates of the volumetric flow rate of water at a point in a river. Rating curves are developed from multiple observations – often termed gaugings – of stage and flow at a particular measuring location.

WaterML2.0 part 2 has been submitted by the Australian Bureau of Meteorology, CSIRO, USGS, Aquatic Informatics, KISTERS and the UK Centre for Ecology and Hydrology.

The documents for the candidate OGC WaterML2.0 - part 2: Ratings, Gaugings and Sections Standard are available for review and comment at  http://www.opengeospatial.org/standards/requests/132. This candidate standard includes a platform independent UML model and XML encoding.

The OGC is an international consortium of more than 500 companies, government agencies, research organizations, and universities participating in a consensus process to develop publicly available geospatial standards. OGC Standards support interoperable solutions that "geo-enable" the Web, wireless and location-based services, and mainstream IT. OGC Standards empower technology developers to make geospatial information and services accessible and useful with any application that needs to be geospatially enabled. Visit the OGC website at http://www.opengeospatial.org.

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11 March 2015 – Two global organizations, the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) and the InLocation Alliance (ILA), have begun working together to advance indoor positioning capabilities.

While outdoor navigation is common place, much work is still needed to exploit the full potential of indoor Location Based Services supported by reliable and affordable indoor location positioning systems. ILA members are actively pursuing a common architectural framework supporting the delivery of complex solutions featuring indoor location determination, mapping and navigation. The OGC provides a standards forum in which indoor location stakeholders are working together to develop open standard ways of communicating the indoor location information provided by those solutions.

Open standards from OGC and ISO (International Organization for Standardization) have become the dominant standards for communicating outdoor ("geospatial") data and information. With standards like IndoorGML and CityGML, the OGC has already provided elements of the necessary indoor location standards infrastructure.

Jouni Kämäräinen, Board Chair of the InLocation Alliance is "very glad to publish this Liaison Agreement with OGC. When the ILA published the System Architecture white paper for indoor positioning solutions in September, 2014 we welcomed close collaboration with relevant SDOs. ILA sees OGC as a key standardization organization for building information modelling, which is an essential element for superior consumer experience and high quality applications."

George Percivall, Chief Engineer, Open Geospatial Consortium stated that “Indoor is the new frontier of spatial information – a frontier that needs sharable maps. The remarkable new technologies that determine indoor locations and map indoor spaces need to be able to communicate spatial coordinates and space identifiers (room type, building floor, ownership, restrictions etc.) in a standard way to serve many types of applications. The OGC is very pleased to be working with ILA to advance the state of indoor location."

About the InLocation Alliance - Formally established August 2012, and a member program of the IEEE-ISTO Federation, the InLocation Alliance is an industry collaboration dedicated to promoting indoor positioning solutions that directly benefit the industry and users of indoor location services and solutions on mobile devices. http://www.inlocationalliance.org.

About the OGC® - The OGC® is an international geospatial standards consortium of more than 500 companies, government agencies, research organizations, and universities participating in a consensus process to develop publicly available standards. OGC standards support interoperable solutions that "geo-enable" the Web, wireless and location-based services, and mainstream IT. Visit the OGC website at http://www.opengeospatial.org/.

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9 March 2015. The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC®) membership has approved the OGC® Information Technology Standards for Sustainable Development white paper. This important document for environmental science, business and policy is available free at https://portal.opengeospatial.org/files/60920.

An integrated information technology (IT) standards platform for communicating digital environmental data is a critical requirement for social and economic progress in the “Anthropocene Epoch”, the current era in which humanity's expanding footprint has become the main cause of change in the planet's geology, water bodies, atmosphere and biosphere. The authors argue for a concerted and ongoing global effort to 1) define data communication and system interoperability requirements for environmental science, business and policy, and then 2) develop and implement consensus-derived, free and open environmental Information Technology (IT) standards that meet those requirements and that co-evolve with the larger IT standards framework and advances in IT.

Measuring and managing our impact on the Earth requires constant and widespread communication and integration of spatial environmental information.

The volume of environmental data flowing from sensors, satellites, citizens, models etc. grows exponentially. However, it has little value if it can’t be easily discovered, assessed, accessed, compared, aggregated, processed, and passed from system to system.

Denise McKenzie, OGC’s Executive Director, Communications and Outreach, will be presenting on the whitepaper on Thursday, 12 March, as the key speaker in the Sustainable Management of our Natural Resources stream at the Locate15 conference in Brisbane, Australia.

The OGC® is an international consortium of more than 500 companies, government agencies, research organizations, and universities participating in a consensus process to develop publicly available geospatial standards. OGC standards support interoperable solutions that "geo-enable" the Web, wireless and location-based services, and mainstream IT. Visit the OGC website at http://www.opengeospatial.org/.

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4 March 2015 - The membership of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC®) seeks public comment on the candidate OGC CF-netCDF 3.0 encoding using the GML Coverage Application Schema Standard.

This new addition to the netCDF suite of standards provides additional ways to serve complex multi-dimensional CF-netCDF data for use in geographic information systems (GIS) or other geospatial systems not capable of handling complex CF-netCDF data.

The OGC CF-netCDF 3.0 encoding standard (Climate and Forecast conventions for netCDF) has emerged as a widely used and well supported data model and encoding for domains such as atmospheric science, oceanography, climatology, meteorology, and hydrology. It supports multi-dimensional gridded data and multi-dimensional multi-point data representing space and time-varying phenomena.

This candidate standard specifies an extension of CF-netCDF 3.0. This extension is an encoding model of the CF-netCDF dataset that uses the OGC GML Application Schema – Coverages schema. The GML Application Schema – Coverages schema (GMLCOV) specifies the OGC Geography Markup Language (GML) coverage structures to be used by OGC standards. OGC coverages are two- (and sometimes higher-) dimensional metaphors for phenomena found on or near a portion of the Earth's surface, including, for example, Earth imaging data, regular and irregular grids, point clouds, and meshes.

The OGC CF-netCDF 3.0 encoding using the GML Coverage Application Schema Standard supports three different ways of encoding the CF-netCDF data model: binary, XML, or ASCII.

The documents for the candidate OGC CF-netCDF 3.0 encoding using the GML Coverage Application Schema Standard Standard are available for review and comment at (http://www.opengeospatial.org/standards/requests/131).

The OGC is an international consortium of more than 500 companies, government agencies, research organizations, and universities participating in a consensus process to develop publicly available geospatial standards. OGC Standards support interoperable solutions that "geo-enable" the Web, wireless and location-based services, and mainstream IT. OGC Standards empower technology developers to make geospatial information and services accessible and useful with any application that needs to be geospatially enabled. Visit the OGC website at http://www.opengeospatial.org.

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27 February 2015. Members of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC®) request comments on the draft charter for an OGC Common DataBase Standards Working Group. This Standards Working Group (SWG) is being formed to develop and propose one or more candidate standards for a common terrain database model and encoding useful for both runtime synthetic environment generation and terrain database repositories for modeling and simulation.

This SWG will begin work by examining and considering the existing Common DataBase (CDB) Specification Version 3.2 that is currently maintained as a de-facto industry standard by CAE Inc. The convener and charter members believe that the existing CDB specification is a combination of a data model, an encoding specification, and engineering practices / tutorials tailored for implementers of CDB. An early deliverable of the SWG will be a recommendation of which specific OGC standards products and documents are appropriate for conversion of the existing specification to fit more closely within the architecture of OGC standards and practices.

The proposed OGC Common DataBase SWG charter can be downloaded from https://portal.opengeospatial.org/files/62190.

If you have any suggestions or comments, please send them to charter-requests [at] opengeospatial [dot] org

This is a 30 day review period. The review and comment period will end 29 March 2015.

The convener of the OGC Common DataBase Standards Working Group is David Graham, CAE Inc.


The following charter members of the SWG are committed to the charter and projected meeting schedule. Others may join this list before the SWG is officially chartered.

  David Graham, CAE Inc.

  Mike Lokuta, CAE USA, Inc.

  Steve Liang, University of Calgary  

  Dan Maxwell, KadSci    

The OGC® is an international consortium of more than 500 companies, government agencies, research organizations, and universities participating in a consensus process to develop publicly available geospatial standards. OGC standards support interoperable solutions that "geo-enable" the Web, wireless and location-based services, and mainstream IT. Visit the OGC website at http://www.opengeospatial.org/.




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25 February 2015. The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC®) membership has approved the OGC® Smart Cities Spatial Information Framework white paper. This essential document for Smart City systems planning is available free at https://portal.opengeospatial.org/files/?artifact_id=61188.

 

Urban residents make up 54% of the global population, and that percentage is growing rapidly. Effective integration of human, physical, and digital systems operating in the built environment holds the promise of improving the quality of life for urban residents, improving the governance of cities and making cities prosperous, inclusive, sustainable and resilient. Location is a primary method for organizing urban information and services, and communicating about location requires standards. This paper addresses an open information technology standards framework that is critical to achieving the benefits of spatial communication for Smart Cities.

A Smart City uses location as an organizing principal to benefit residents, visitors, and businesses of all types. (Graphic from Steve Liang, University of Calgary)

 

When organized using the concepts of space and time, information about cities can be the basis for many powerful services, analytics and decision-making. Realizing these benefits depends on effective communication of location information. That communication happens when platform, system and application developers agree on location data encodings and spatial software interfaces. Even simple point location queries and responses require agreement on the naming and ordering of many parameters.

 

This OGC White Paper provides the beginnings of a spatial information framework for urban spatial intelligence based on open standards such as OGC CityGML, IndoorGML, Moving Features, and Augmented Reality Markup Language 2.0 (ARML 2.0). A spatial information framework provides the basis to integrate GIS features, imagery, sensor observations and social media in support of city governance and services.

 

Open standards from OGC, ISO and other standards organizations meet the need for interoperability, efficiency, application innovation and cost effectiveness. They have been developed over the last two decades by industry, government, NGO and academic partners. Many of the most important standards are widely implemented by vendors and solution providers.

 

This paper provides critical guidance on how to plan and implement open spatial standards architectures that guide deployment of interoperable information system components. It discusses open standards for mobile location communication, 3D urban models, building information models, indoor navigation, augmented reality, and sensor webs. It also gives Smart City system architects insight into how changing computing paradigms, particularly the widespread use of XML and the rise of RESTful programming, figure into Smart City planning.

 

The OGC® is an international consortium of more than 500 companies, government agencies, research organizations, and universities participating in a consensus process to develop publicly available geospatial standards. OGC standards support interoperable solutions that "geo-enable" the Web, wireless and location-based services, and mainstream IT. Visit the OGC website at http://www.opengeospatial.org/.


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24 February 2015. The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) membership has approved the OGC® Augmented Reality Markup Language 2.0 Interface Standard (ARML 2.0). ARML 2.0 provides a free and open, non-proprietary encoding that augmented reality (AR) content providers can use to specify the visual appearance and real world “anchors” (including location) of virtual objects in an AR scene. Additionally, ARML 2.0 defines an interface (based on ECMAScript) for communicating how user input selects, queries and dynamically changes the properties of these virtual objects.

Augmented Reality (AR) content encoded in ARML 2.0 displayed in Wikitude, Layar and Junaio browsers respectively. (Image from Wikitude)

Augmented reality provides a computer-generated overlay on images of the real world, typically in real time. The overlay provides information — AR content, that is, text and symbols  — associated to real world objects in those images.

AR usually requires a device such as a smartphone that has a screen and camera providing see-through display of real world scenes. The device must also have location sensors (typically GPS) and sensors that detect and report camera motion and orientation. A (usually remote) AR server will have data about the locations of real world objects (spatial coordinates or visual patterns that can be tracked in the camera of the device) and data from an AR content database.  The server thus matches real objects in the image to AR content objects and displays them for the user. The scene and overlaid computer-generated objects are constantly updated as the camera moves. Users interact with the system by pointing and moving the camera, passively or actively selecting real world objects to see their associated AR content. AR content for a mountain landscape, for example, might give the name of the mountain closest to the center of view.

Various vendors aggregate information from restaurant owners, tourism bureaus, etc. to provide computer-generated AR content – text and symbols associated to a particular place. The content can be used only with that vendor’s AR platform. ARML 2.0, on the other hand, provides an open AR content encoding language and service interface. The benefit for content providers is that they can now produce AR content that can be used on any vendor’s AR platform, if that vendor implements the ARML 2.0 service interface. Most existing proprietary content can be converted in a batch process to ARML 2.0 content, thus opening it up to multiple AR platforms and applications.

Martin Lechner, Chairman of the OGC ARML 2.0 Standards Working Group and CTO at Wikitude GmbH, noted the pre-adoption implementations of the standards: "Our belief in the need for an AR interoperability standard has been validated by all the existing and new implementations already making use of ARML 2.0, even before it was officially approved. I am grateful to our Working Group members and all those who helped make this possible. This is an important milestone for everyone seeking interoperability in the awesome world of Augmented Reality!"

Martin Lechner, Chairman of the OGC ARML 2.0 Standards Working Group and CTO at Wikitude GmbH.

The OGC Augmented Reality Markup Language 2.0 Interface Standard document package can be downloaded from http://www.opengeospatial.org/standards/arml.

The OGC® is an international consortium of more than 500 companies, government agencies, research organizations, and universities participating in a consensus process to develop publicly available geospatial standards. OGC standards support interoperable solutions that "geo-enable" the Web, wireless and location-based services, and mainstream IT. Visit the OGC website at http://www.opengeospatial.org/.





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17 February 2015 – The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC®) membership has approved the OGC Moving Feature Encoding Model and Encoding as an official OGC standard. This standard defines an abstract model for encoding moving feature data compliant with ISO 19141:2008 Schema for moving features, and, based on the abstract model, it also includes an XML encoding in the form of an OGC Geography Markup Language (GML) application schema, and a simple CSV (comma-separated value) encoding format.

The advance of mobile computing and internet-connected sensors (including sensors and GPS transponders in cell phones and notebook computers) brings with it a rapid rise in applications for moving feature data, typically representing vehicles or pedestrians. Many innovative moving feature applications will require the overlay and integration of moving feature data from different sources. Examples can easily be imagined for disaster risk management, traffic information services, security services, navigation for robots, aviation or maritime traffic monitoring, and wildlife tracking and conservation. Most current applications, however, are limited to single-source moving feature data. Lack of a standard encoding makes it difficult to integrate moving feature data from different sources.

More efficient exchange of moving feature data will result in a requirement for massive data handling. The CSV style encoding provides an efficient and easily understood standard for encoding lightweight data records, which will be important for many applications involving large data volumes and real-time response. The GML application schema style encoding for Moving Features provides for the encoding of more complex spatial information. The OGC Moving Feature Encoding Model could also support other types of encodings.

This standard addresses only “rigid” moving features, such as vehicles, as opposed to those that deform, such as flood water, and it does not address moving features whose descriptions contain other moving features that must be updated as the feature moves, such as control surfaces on an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). It also is for archived Moving Feature data only, and not for live feeds from sensors.

The OGC Moving Feature Encoding Standard is available at http://www.opengeospatial.org/standards/movingfeatures.

The OGC is an international consortium of more than 500 companies, government agencies, research organizations, and universities participating in a consensus process to develop publicly available geospatial standards. OGC standards support interoperable solutions that "geo-enable" the Web, wireless and location-based services, and mainstream IT. OGC standards empower technology developers to make geospatial information and services accessible and useful with any application that needs to be geospatially enabled. Visit the OGC website at http://www.opengeospatial.org/contact.

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